Africa (58)
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    eautifully written yet highly controversial, An Image of Africa asserts Achebe’s belief in Joseph Conrad as a ‘bloody racist’ and his conviction that Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness only serves to perpetuate damaging stereotypes of black people. Also included is The Trouble with Nigeria, Achebe’s searing outpouring of his frustrations with his country. GREAT IDEAS. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.


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    Harmattan Rain, shortlisted for the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, Best First Book, follows three generations of women as they cope with family, love and life. A few years before Ghana’s independence, Lizzie-Achiaa’s lover disappears. Intent on finding him, she runs away from home. Akua Afriyie, Lizzie-Achiaa’s first daughter, strikes out on her own as a single parent in a country rocked by successive coups. Her daughter, Sugri grows up overprotected. She leaves home for university in New York, where she learns that sometimes one can have too much freedom. In the end, the secrets parents keep from their children eventually catch up with them.Harmattan Rain, shortlisted for the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, Best First Book, follows three generations of women as they cope with family, love and life. A few years before Ghana’s independence, Lizzie-Achiaa’s lover disappears. Intent on finding him, she runs away from home. Akua Afriyie, Lizzie-Achiaa’s first daughter, strikes out on her own as a single parent in a country rocked by successive coups. Her daughter, Sugri grows up overprotected. She leaves home for university in New York, where she learns that sometimes one can have too much freedom. In the end, the secrets parents keep from their children eventually catch up with them.


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    A riveting kaleidoscopic debut novel and the beginning of a major career: Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing is a novel about race, history, ancestry, love and time, charting the course of two sisters torn apart in 18th century Africa through to the present day.
    Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonist, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising “half-caste” children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the Empire. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle’s women’s dungeon, before being shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery.
    Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and—with outstanding economy and force—captures the intricacies of the troubled yet hopeful human spirit.


    Homegoing by: Yaa Gyasi GHS 43.00
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    sarah ladipo manyika’s like a mule bringing ice cream to the sun is the rare sort of book that from the instant you pick up, you know that you will be privy to the most intimate secrets.


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    People feel angry and let down by their leaders, as well as by the institutions that dominate their lives: political parties, government bureaucracy, and corporations. Yet the cause of this malaise, according to political–advisor–turned–tech–CEO Steve Hilton, is not being addressed by politicians on the left or the right.

    Hilton argues that much of our daily experience—from the food we eat, to the governments we elect, to the economy on which our wealth depends, to the way we care for our health and well–being—has become too big, too bureaucratic, and too distant from the human scale.

    More Human sets out a radical manifesto for change, aimed at the root causes of our problems rather than just the symptoms. Whether it’s using the latest advances in neuroscience to inform the fight against poverty and inequality, or applying lessons from America’s most radical schools to transform our children’s education, this book is an agenda for rethinking and redesigning the outdated systems and structures of our politics, government, economy, and society to make them more suited to the way we want to live our lives today. To make them more human.


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    Yayra Amenyo’s life is no longer perfect and these are the reasons why: 1. She killed her father. 2. Her mother acts like everything is normal when it isn’t. 3. Her boyfriend is on ‘a break’ with her. 4. She looks like a freak. 5. She’s moved to a town far from anyone she knows. 6. She has to repeat Form Two in SHS. Could her life get any worse? Will she ever get her life to be as perfect as it once was?


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    Season of Crimson Blossoms tells the captivating story of an illicit affair between a twenty-five-year-old street gang leader, Hassan Reza, and a devout fifty-five-year-old widow and grandmother, Binta Zubairu, who yearns for intimacy after the sexual repression of her marriage and the pain of losing her first son. This story of love and longing—set in a conservative Muslim community in Nigeria—reveals deep emotions that defy age, class, and religion.

    This novel gives a unique perspective on life and relationships in Northern Nigeria, a region vastly under-represented in the body of world literature.


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