Africa (4)
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    A compulsively readable debut novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream—the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy


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    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s lettedr of response.
    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, an perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.


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    A riveting kaleidoscopic debut novel and the beginning of a major career: Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing is a novel about race, history, ancestry, love and time, charting the course of two sisters torn apart in 18th century Africa through to the present day.
    Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonist, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising “half-caste” children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the Empire. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle’s women’s dungeon, before being shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery.
    Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and—with outstanding economy and force—captures the intricacies of the troubled yet hopeful human spirit.


    Homegoing by: Yaa Gyasi GHS 43.00
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    “I believe we are on the cusp of an African food revolution. There is a longing to try something that is actually new, not just re-spun, and African cuisines are lling that gap. It’s the last continent of relatively unexplored food in the mainstream domain. For too long Africans have kept this incredible food a greedy secret.” – Zoe Adjonyoh
    Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen was a pop-up restaurant in the UK that grew into a huge success by word-of-mouth. Here Zoe takes traditional Ghanaian recipes and re-mixes them for the modern kitchen. From Pan-roasted Cod with Grains of Paradise and Nkruma (Okra) Tempura to Coconut and Cassava Cake and Cubeb Spiced Shortbread, Ghanaian food is always fun, always relaxed and always tasty!
    These fabulous Ghanaian dishes are homemade favorites, focusing on traditional avors with Zoe’s twist. Simple to cook and very exible – you can take the basic principles and adapt them easily to what you have available in your cupboard or fridge – you can prepare your own wonderful vibrant Ghanaian dishes.


    Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen by: GHS 72.00